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When Is Acorn Squash Ready to Harvest

Acorn squash is a type of squash that belongs to the group of winter squashes because of the time they can be stored. With days to maturity between 85 to 90 days after planting, time may vary depending on weather conditions. So, how to know when acorn squashes are ready to harvest? This article summarizes all the tips you need to know to determine When to Harvest Acorn Squash. Let’s start.

Acorn squash grows well in USDA zones 3 to 12 and is ready to harvest in approximately 85 days. Continue reading to learn more about When to Harvest Acorn Squash and how to know when it is ready to harvest correctly.

When Is Acorn Squash Ready to Harvest

Here are all the tips you need to know to determine When to Harvest Acorn Squash.

When Is Acorn Squash Ready to Harvest? Acorn squash is ready to be harvested 85 to 90 days after planting. However, suppose you have not planted the acorn squash seeds and have started your crop with a seedling from a nursery. In that case, you probably do not know the crop’s number of days or days to maturity. So, when to harvest Acron squash is a valid question. I’ll explain how to find out when is the right time for picking and harvesting them.

Not only should you pay attention to the number of days elapsed to know when acorn squash is ready to harvest. You should observe the skin and color of the acorn squash.

As a gardener, there are a few signs you should pay attention to understand when to harvest acorn Squash. Observe the skin of the acorn squash that is in contact with the ground. The skin should be bright orange. If the skin of the acorn squash in contact with the environment is not bright orange, the squash is not ripe yet. The rest of the acorn squash will have a dark green color.

Also, you can look at the size of the acorn squash to see if you can harvest the acorn squash. Typically, acorn squashes are 5” to 8” (13 to 20 cm) in diameter. Approximately each acorn squash plant produces 6 to 8 acorn squashes.

Press with the fingernail on the skin of the acorn squash. If the fingernail leaves a mark on the skin of the squash is that it is still to ripen. The skin of the acorn squash will be hard when it is ready to be harvested.

Note that not all acorn squash will ripen at the same time. Note that the vine begins to dry out as the acorn squashes mature. That is how to know when to harvest acorn squashes and moreover how to realize they are ready to harvest.

In summary, to know when acorn squash is ready to harvest, you should observe the color, size, and hardness of the skin of the acorn squash. Harvesting acorn squash at the right time will allow you to store the squash longer and get the best flavor.

when to harvest acorn squash
When Is Acorn Squash Ready to Harvest? The acorn squash will be ripe after 85 to 90 days of planting (usually called “days of maturity”). In the image above, you can see an acorn squash that is still a few days away from maturity. Note that not all acorn squash will ripen at the same time. Note that the vine begins to dry out as the acorn squashes mature. That is how to know when acorn squashes are ready to harvest.

How to Harvest Acorn Squash

Now you know when to harvest, I will explain how to harvest acorn squash to get a maximum plant yield.

How to Harvest Acorn Squash? I will say, harvesting acorn squash is simply once you determine when to harvest them.

You will need pruning shears or a sharp knife to harvest acorn squash. Before cutting the acorn squash stems, disinfect your tools. It is important that the tools you use are sharp so as not to damage the vine. Remember that not all acorn squash ripens simultaneously.

Once you select the ripe acorn squash, cut the stem and leave a 1″ to 2″ (2.5 to 5 cm) stem, the stem will help the acorn squash store longer. Cutting acorn squash too close to the stem may cause the squash to become infected or an insect to enter through the stem.

Acorn squash that you observe that are not yet ripe should be left to ripen on the vine. If there is a risk of frost, protect the squash, or you may have to harvest them a little early. Continue reading to learn how to store acorn squash for a long time.

Recommended Post: When to Harvest Early White Scallop Squash

Cure and Store Acorn Squash

After harvesting your acorn squashes, you should store them. How to do it? It is very simple. The squash should be cured to store acorn squash for several months before storage. Select squash that has no damage or soft spots on the skin, squash that have any skin damage should be consumed and not stored. Place the acorn squash in a cool, dry place with good ventilation, and avoid places where it can get wet in the rain. The curing process lasts 10 to 14 days, and the ideal temperature for curing acorn squash is 80 to 85 °F (27 to 29 °C). Do not stack squash for curing, or it may be damaged.

harvest and store acorn squash
Harvest and Store Acorn Squash. Acorn squash is very tasty and can be stored without refrigeration for many months.

Final Conclusions About When to Harvest Acorn Squash

Let’s see a couple of final thoughts regarding harvesting acorn squash. Now you know when to harvest acorn squash and how to know when it is ready to pick, which will help you get more flavorful acorn squash. Of course, harvesting acorn squash at the right time will help you store the squash longer. Remember always to use sharp, disinfected tools to pick acorn squash.

I hope this article about when acorn squash is ready to harvest will be useful. Get your acorn squash seeds at West Coast Seeds. We recommend our other articles about harvest squash:

About Henry Morgan

Henry Morgan is an agronomist horticulture founder of The Garden Style Company and The Garden Style Website. He previously worked for Mondelēz International as an Agronomist Engineer specializing in agricultural products management in highly populated areas. In 2000, Henry started working with farmer-producers in agricultural businesses selling wholesale fresh produce and retail plants in Van Buren, Arkansas. Nowadays, Henry lives in California, where he offers expert consulting services for organic vegetable gardening. As a science writer working with his wife, Julia, Henry shares his passion for gardening and farming, trying to reach and teach as many folks as possible.

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