When and How to Harvest Rhubarb the Right Way

Rhubarb can be eaten raw, in salads, but the most common way to prepare it is cooked with sugar for juice, jam, chutney, and compote. Learn all about when and how to harvest rhubarb in this article.

This species is composed of 95% water. Rhubarb is excellent for the blood, liver, and digestive system, in addition to the digestive system, as well as providing vitamins A and C, potassium, calcium, and fiber to the diet.

Rhubarb is a cool-season vegetable adapted to harsh climates to adverse climates, growing in a wide variety of soils, but is recommended in well-drained soils fertilized with manure or compost and in areas with good sun exposure.

The rhubarb plant should be watered periodically that maintain constant humidity in the soil without puddling.

When to Harvest Rhubarb

When to Harvest Rhubarb? From spring to autumn, the rhubarb stalks are harvested from the base when they reach a size between 12” and 24” (30 and 60 cm). It is not advisable to cut more than half of the stalks of a rhubarb in the same year because it weakens the rhubarb plant.

The best time to harvest rhubarb is when its stalks measure between 12” and 24” (30 and 60 cm). Harvesting rhubarb stalks with these measurements will ensure that the plant will support the harvest.

It is also possible to harvest rhubarb stalks before these measures, but only take a few stalks, as harvesting too many stalks can weaken the rhubarb plant.

It is important to know when to harvest rhubarb and to give the rhubarb plant its rest time so that it can survive the winter. Ideally, do not harvest more rhubarb stalks in the fall, so your plant can save energy for the winter.

The highest yields are achieved in the third year with values between 30 and 70 tn of values between 30 and 70 tn of. Stalks/ha. The rhubarb plant is productive up to 8 years of age, approximately.

when to harvest rhubarb
When to Harvest Rhubarb? Rhubarb can be harvested from spring to autumn, as long as the leaves are more than 12″ (30 cm) long.

How to Harvest Rhubarb

How to Harvest Rhubarb? Harvesting rhubarb is not difficult at all. The best way to harvest rhubarb is to use a sharp knife to cut stalks longer than 12” (30 cm). You should also harvest rhubarb by breaking the stalk by hand, but it is preferable to use a knife. Remember to always disinfect the knife before using it.

You should never harvest all the rhubarb stalks so as not to kill the plant and to be able to continue harvesting, a rhubarb plant can give harvests for 5 to 8 years. You should throw the rhubarb leaves into the compost bin to generate compost. Rhubarb leaves should not be consumed because they are poisonous, only the rhubarb stalk is consumed.

Best Way to Pick Rhubarb

Best Way to Pick Rhubarb. As mentioned above, if rhubarb is harvested correctly, it can live for 8 or more years. It is advisable to harvest rhubarb every year to avoid the overpopulation of rhubarb in the garden.

When you notice thin rhubarb stalks, you should stop harvesting. Thin stalks on rhubarb are a sign that the plant needs to recover energy in order to continue its development.

Be sure to leave at least 2 to 3 rhubarb stalks to encourage the development of the rhubarb plant for next year.

Does Rhubarb Regrow After Cutting?

Does Rhubarb Regrow After Cutting? As mentioned above, rhubarb is a perennial vegetable that grows year after year. In order for the rhubarb plant to regrow year after year and have a good harvest, rhubarb should be stopped from being harvested in the fall. This will ensure that the rhubarb stores energy to carry it through the winter.

We recommend our article about how to grow rhubarb. If you have any further questions about rhubarb, please do not hesitate to contact us through our contact form.

does rhubarb grow after cutting
Does Rhubarb Regrow After Cutting? Of course, rhubarb grows after cutting, always be sure to leave at least 2 stalks to regrow.
About Henry Morgan

We are the Morgan family, Henry, and Julia, both agronomists from the University of Michigan, where we met. We are experts in putting our hands in the soil and developing organic foods and improving production processes for decades. Likewise, we have worked for companies such as Mondelez International, BASF, Monsanto, etc. currently in our role as science writers for TheGardenStyle.com as well as advisors in promoting large scale food growing in urbanized areas. In this website, we share what we are most passionate about, gardening and farming. Enjoy and see real photos on our website.