Harvest Moon Squash – Grow, Care, and Harvest

Recently some readers wrote to me asking for information about harvest moon squash and that is why in this article I will explain how to grow, care for and harvest the harvest moon squash.

Harvest moon squash is a winter squash that can be stored for a long time if cured properly. This squash has a sweet flavor and is very delicious to prepare all kinds of meals. Read on to learn all about harvest moon squash.

How to Grow Harvest Moon Squash

Harvest moon squash should be grown in direct sowing, it is possible to grow this squash in a seedbed, but I recommend direct sowing after the last frost. Soak the harvest moon squash seeds to be planted for about 6 hours. Only use squash seeds that do not float, seeds that float are useless.

In well-drained, nutrient-rich soil, place harvest moon squash seeds at a depth of 1″ (2.5 cm). For fruit development the squash plant needs soils rich in potassium and nitrogen, you can add compost. Sow the seeds in a location where the squash plant receives 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight per day.

Be sure to leave plenty of space between each harvest moon squash plant because they grow quite large. Harvest moon squash is usually about 6″ (15 cm) in size and weighs between 11 and 15 lbs. (5 to 7 kg).

With these tips, you will soon see how the harvest moon squash seedlings are growing. The fruits of this squash take 90 to 100 days to ripen.

how to grow harvest moon squash
Squash seedlings in full growth.

How to Care Harvest Moon Squash

Harvest moon squash is very similar in care to other varieties of squash. The soil where you grow squash should have good drainage and be rich in organic matter. You can make a compost bin to have organic matter for all the plants in your garden.

During the growth of the harvest moon squash fruits, it is good to fertilize with organic matter or some fertilizer rich in nitrogen and potassium. Squash fruits will develop better if they have nutritious soil.

Keep the soil of the harvest moon squash plant moist, but never waterlogged. I recommend the article about how often to water pumpkins. Overwatering squash can cause the squash roots to rot and fungal diseases to appear.

Having nutrient-rich, well-drained soil will help prevent pests and diseases in the squash plant. If you have a pest problem on your squash plant, you can use neem oil or diatomaceous earth to eliminate the pests.

How to Harvest Harvest Moon Squash

Harvest moon squash takes 90 to 100 days to mature. Not only note on the calendar the days of ripening of the squash, but also note the overall condition of the squash.

When the harvest moon squash is ready to be harvested, the skin will be hard. Press with your fingernail against the skin of the squash and if there are no marks, the squash is ready to be harvested.

Not all squash will ripen at the same time. Use a sharp, disinfected knife to harvest squash, so you don’t damage the plant. Once the squash is harvested, it must be cured to be able to store it for a long time.

Place the harvest moon squash in a well-ventilated place but protected from rain for about 14 days to allow the squash to cure. The ideal curing temperature for harvest moon squash is between 80 and 85 °F (27 to 29 °C). Once the curing process is complete, you can store harvest moon squash for up to 6 months.

how to pick harvest moon squash
Squash ready for storage. Always leave some of the stem on the squash for better storage.

Final Conclusions

The harvest moon squash is a very tasty squash for preparing a variety of foods, and an advantage is that it can be easily stored for a long time. Plants of this squash variety have good resistance against powdery mildew.

I hope you find this article helpful and have lots of harvest moon squash to enjoy. I recommend our articles about when to harvest red Kuri squash and when to harvest Pattypan squash.

About Henry Morgan

We are the Morgan family, Henry, and Julia, both agronomists from the University of Michigan, where we met. We are experts in putting our hands in the soil and developing organic foods and improving production processes for decades. Likewise, we have worked for companies such as Mondelez International, BASF, Monsanto, etc. currently in our role as science writers for TheGardenStyle.com as well as advisors in promoting large scale food growing in urbanized areas. In this website, we share what we are most passionate about, gardening and farming. Enjoy and see real photos on our website.